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fotojournalismus:

Festival of the Good Death Celebrated in Cachoeira, Brazil

The Afro-Brazilian Sisterhood of the Good Death is made up of female descendants of slaves, all age 50 and over, and honours both Catholic traditions and Afro-Brazilian Candomble religious rites. The sisterhood is believed to be the oldest organization for women of African descent in the Americas. The state of Bahia received at least 1.2 million slaves from Africa and remains the most African of Brazilian states, where blacks make up around 80 percent of the population.

Photos by Mario Tama/Getty Images — August 14-17, 2014.

(via radicalmuscle)

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isharedfoundlove:

tezthinks:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

heytoyourmamanem:

Fannie Lou Hamer’s testimony before the Credentials Committee, Democratic National Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey - August 22, 1964

via American Experience

President Johnson holding a press conference in order to keep Fannie Lou Hamer’s testimony from playing live on television is definitely top 10 bitch moves of all time.

You tried it though. Lol.

Watch the full PBS Freedom Summer documentary. 

Despite everything they’ve tried before and now, Black is and will always be Powerful.

Wow, her last sentence gave me chills!!

"We gon’ to make you wish you was dead." ~Ms. Fannie Lou Hamer.

(Source: youtube.com)

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metaphysical-technicality:

chescaleigh:

I was in a serious funk today dealing with hate mail and YouTube drama, so instead of bumming around and feeling frustrated, I decided to start a Google group specifically for content creators of color. The goal is to have a group of smart, motivated and driven individuals who are looking to network, collaborate and motivate other online content creators. Bloggers, YouTubers, journalists, writers, musicians, podcasters WHATEVER. If you use the internet to make stuff and you’re a POC, this is the spot for you.

Admittedly, this is a completely new venture for me, I have no idea how this is gonna work or how many people are gonna join, so bear with me and let’s make some cool stuff. 

poc-creators, mmanalysis, inthespiritofbeing, tokeninamerica, mamayashi, alexandraelle, thatjayjustice, blackgirlsarefromthefuture, fyblackwomenart, locsofpoetry, breegant, pizzaizbae, acollectedgentleman, daniellemertina, messynefertiti, ethiopienne, chahlie

If theorlandojones came across this I would dance.

Honored to be listed.

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zzazu:

this photo makes me feel like someone traveled to an alternate dimension and brought back something that shouldnt exist

zzazu:

this photo makes me feel like someone traveled to an alternate dimension and brought back something that shouldnt exist

(Source: vhsdreamz, via sundaybliss)

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niaking:

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY, you can buy my book directly through me instead of going through Amazon. I will even sign it for you. Just send $20 to niaking@zoho.com via PayPal and include your address in the “notes” section. I ship within the US ONLY. For international orders, please use Amazon.com.

Photos by Pendarvis Harshaw.

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niaking:

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY, you can buy my book directly through me instead of going through Amazon. I will even sign it for you. Just send $20 to niaking@zoho.com via PayPal and include your address in the “notes” section. I ship within the US ONLY. For international orders, please use Amazon.com.

Photos by Pendarvis Harshaw.

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"…[I]n the cases of Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum, as in the case of Daniel Holtzclaw and his alleged victims, the idea of sex work as an important factor in the crime continues to be obscured by other supposedly more important issues, watered down to nothing in order to be considered palatable to sensitive audiences. The few conversations I’ve seen on Twitter, Tumblr, and the occasional news articles and blogs focus only on the collective (non)reactions of people when a Black woman is the victim of violent crime. I do not want to take anything away from that analysis. I know it’s absolutely true: Black women are the least and the last in line for anger, rage, justice, pity, sympathy, and empathy…

…Black women are upset, we are incredibly sad, we are begging to be cared for, and we have a right to feel this way. We are completely correct in our steadfast refusal to simply disappear into the ether when we are violated, when our lives are snuffed out. We are justified in our anguish and in our anger. We are righteous in this, and I am not here to take away from it. I am here standing with my sisters and speaking out too. We are the most spotless of lambs, sinless in our desire to simply be seen as just as important as anyone else. But, what I am also here to say is this: in the midst of the tangible and thickening silence from what could arguably be called one of the most vocal corners of twitter, Black Feminist Twitter, and even Feminist Twitter as a whole; in the midst of the silence from virtually everyone and everywhere: where is the outrage for two teenage girls who were brutally murdered? Is the outrage lacking because of their race? Definitely. Is it non-existent because of their reported interactions with law enforcement? Absolutely. But it is also lacking because they were reported as working as exotic dancers. This cannot be denied. It is unfair and unethical to say anything different.

…We cannot, while decrying violence against Black women and confessing our desire to be seen, heard, and cared for; deny both the intersection of Black womanhood and sex work as a blind spot and the incredible violence Black sex workers face. There comes a point where we must be willing, if we are able, to speak out against the erasure and shame that is so often laid on Black women who also work in the sex trades. We must be willing to consistently speak out about the casual shaming and stigma that is so often attached to our existence.

In the midst of writings that throw away the reality of our lives by saying, “It is difficult to determine [why there is no outrage regarding Tjhisha and Angelia],” this task can seem overwhelming. It can be too much to, once again, find yourself erased, consciously ignored, and pushed aside. It can be more than you ever thought you’d be able to take, dealing with the violence levied on sex workers—Black women who are sex workers in particular—by media, bloggers, celebrities, and the public alike. Because it is violence, in a way. It is a violent choice to casually exact things like erasure, stigma, and shaming on people who are already erased, shamed, and stigmatized every day of their lives for something as mundane as simply going to work. It is a form of violence to yell out, “Pay attention to these girls,” while simultaneously harshly erasing them from the conversation. It is violence to use the deaths of Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum as a way to insert oneself into the forefront of a conversation while refusing to acknowledge the young women at all.

Because here is the truth: Ball and Mangum hadn’t reached their 20th birthdays. They came from poorer families. They obviously, judging only from the photos of them that have popped up online, enjoyed their lives–to some extent, at least. They were beautiful Black girls. They were beautiful young girls. They had entire worlds and lifetimes ahead of them. Tjhisha and Angelia were brutally murdered and still, over a week later, not many even know about it. Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum were important, lovely human beings who also worked as strippers.

Acknowledging their work and the violence many full service sex workers and exotic dancers face is not inappropriate. Realizing and admitting the facts is not untoward: Whatever labels we use, strippers; dancers; escorts; street workers; and many other sex workers are required to accept and deal with the high probability of being victimized both during and because of their work. This is life and they live with it every day. They must watch over their shoulders, carry weapons of self defense, and even create plan upon plan upon contingency plan just to arrive home safely at the end of a work day. Beyond that, many working in the sex trades, regardless of job description, must accept that this—the erasure that has happened to Tjhisha and Angelia—may also happen to them if they are the victims of violent crime. For Black women, that acceptance and the weight of it is doubly hard."

peechingtonmariejust in her magnificent  ”More Than Silence: Tjisha Ball, Angelia Mangum, and the Erasure of Black Sex Workers” on Tits and Sass today (via marginalutilite)

(via sexworkerproblems)

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